NEWS

Google builds new subsea cable connecting U.S. East coast to Europe

Google is building a new submarine cable system to connect the East coast of the United States with Europe. TE SubCom has been selected to build the Dunant four-fibre pair cable system, which will span more than 6,400km.

Named after influential innovator and the first Nobel Peace Prize winner, Henri Dunant, the cable will cross the Atlantic Ocean from Virginia Beach in the U.S. to the French Atlantic coast, adding capacity to Google’s global network, and enabling interconnection to other subsea infrastructure in the region. It will be built using SubCom’s A1 cable family, which is optimised for projects compatible with higher DCR, and is expected to become available in late 2020.

Speaking of its appointment, Sanjay Chowbey, president of TE SubCom said: ‘We are proud to be working with Google on this important cable system and to be helping to increase internet performance for all,’

Google has invested in three additional subsea cables as part of a consortium, with the Havfrue, HK-G, and JGA-S cables (see Google expands cloud network with three new subsea cables). TE SubCom has also been busy in subsea markets, having recently been selected by the Interchange Group consortium to build a submarine cable system that connects Vanuatu to the Soloman Islands (see TE SubCom enters contract to construct submarine cable connecting Vanuatu to Soloman Islands).

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