PRODUCT

Coriant launches Vibe X90 carrier-class white box packet switch and aggregation platform

Coriant has introduced the Coriant Vibe X90 Programmable Packet Platform – the first in its Vibe series of carrier-class white boxes – designed to enable cost-efficient service aggregation from access to the core.

Described as a ‘key enabler’ of Coriant’s Hyperscale Carrier Architecture, the Vibe series will be able to provide the foundation for a disaggregated open networking solution or be added to a COTS white box-based disaggregated networking solution to enable/enhance specific network applications.

The X90 model uses packet disaggregation and open software control to allow a reduction in operational costs. Combined with the company’s carrier-class Network Operating Systems (NOS), it can provide a reduction of up to 60% in total cost of ownership. The platform supports 900Gb/s of full-duplex switching capacity in single node configurations and scalability up to 2.7Tb/s in stacked configurations, with further scalability enabled in POD configurations, lending itself well to IP transport network applications. It supports a range of carrier-grade operations, including packet synchronisation (IEEE 1588, SyncE), large packet buffers, ETSI-standard rack sizes, node stacking, and control and data plane redundancy.

Using open, agnostic software control, the Vibe X90 is built upon Open Network Install Environment (ONIE) and Open APIs, enabling flexible software portability with compatible NOS software, such as the Coriant NOS, and SDN/NFV orchestration in multi-vendor, multi-layer environments.

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