PRODUCT

FOCIS WiFi

Fujikura Europe has expanded its portfolio of optical test equipment for the UK market with a WiFi-based solution application available for Android and iOS devices called FOCIS WiFi. 

The FOCIS WiFi allows field installation and maintenance personnel to perform test and inspection operations with precision and mobility through a free app on their own devices which delivers a pass/fail indication in less than one second.

The FOCIS WiFi provides a wireless Fibre Optic Connector Inspection System (FOCIS) to equip personnel with real-time digital analysis and reporting, as well as advanced functionality to save and verify standards instantly. The free app, plus wireless connection of an inspection probe, can be installed on a range of mobile devices including an Android, iOS phone or tablet.

The Focis WIFI systems are comprised of three main products FOCIS WiFi VIEW, FOCIS WiFi PLUS and FOCIS WiFi PRO, with each system having its own key features.

FOCIS WiFi VIEW enables users to view live images of a fibre endface on their smartphone or tablet. FOCIS WiFi PLUS enables users to view, save, recall and share saved endface images via email, text or mobile cloud applications like Dropbox or Google Drive. FOCIS WiFi PRO allows users to automatically analyse connector integrity according to IEC 61300-3-35, AT&T TP-76461 or user-defined standards and save, recall and share results via email, text or mobile cloud applications.

Fujikura will be presenting the NEW FOCIS PRO Inspection Kit (FOCIS WiFi) at ECOC 2014, Europe’s largest optical communications conference and exhibition, held in Cannes, France, in September.

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