PRODUCT

New circuit emulation from Cisco supports speeds to OC-192

A new and highly scalable circuit emulation product is now available from Cisco that supports speeds up to OC-192. Previously, circuit emulation equipment carried speeds up to OC-12. Verizon has implemented this equipment to carry customer traffic on part of its transport network in a move to improve customer experience and increase efficiency on its Intelligent Edge Network.

Circuit emulation enables transport of conventional digital and optical signal rates over a packet-based MPLS network without impacting customer traffic -- creating a smooth migration of legacy services to next-generation infrastructure and improving overall reliability. As part of its next-generation 100G U.S. metro network rollout, Verizon initially deployed this technology where it could aggregate multiple Ethernet and TDM circuits at the same location onto a unified high-speed circuit. Verizon and Cisco have collaborated closely in order to test and implement this equipment, with plans to increase the number of circuits using this technology over the next 10+ years.

‘We have worked hard to deliver this unique solution that will easily enable the growth of Ethernet services while improving the reliability of mission critical TDM private line services,’ said Bill Gartner, vice president, optical systems and optics, service provider business, Cisco.

Lee Hicks, vice president for network infrastructure planning for Verizon added: ‘By implementing innovative deployments like this high-capacity circuit emulation, Verizon continues to set the bar for the highest standards of network performance and efficiency.

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