PRODUCT

PE.fiberoptics unveils fibre geometry measurement system

The FG500HR from PE.fiberoptics is ‘designed to solve all those nagging geometry measurement problems’, the company says. The system implements both IEC recommendations in relation to fibre and coating geometry measurement.

Geometry is the most fundamental of characteristics of the optical fibre and is indicative of the quality control at the manufacturing stage. The geometry of the fibre will determine if it is possible to achieve an acceptably low loss when splicing two fibres together. The geometry measurement system measures the near-field and side-view fibre and coating dimensions to provide all the information that fibre cable manufacturers require.

The FG500HR is designed for the production, laboratory or R&D environments; it is considered unlikely that geometry measurements would be required in a field environment. Like most optical characteristics, the geometry of the fibre is frozen at the time of manufacturing, but it can vary along the length of the fibre. It is useful and considered good practice to measure the geometry even within a cable manufacturing environment to ensure the consistency of the product.

PE.fiberoptics says the latest product was developed in response to end-user demand. Customers value the ability to measure a wider range of coloured fibres, at twice the speed of existing products whilst fully complying with IEC standards, according to Andy Nicholas, sales director.

The FG500HR is designed and built in the UK by PE.fiberoptics. The product is available immediately.

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