PRODUCT

ReCoater 2, AutoCoater 2, MiniCoater 2 and ReCoater 2XL

AFL now offers Nyfors Teknologi AB’s new family of recoating products including the ReCoater 2, AutoCoater 2, MiniCoater 2 and ReCoater 2XL. Ideal for restoring the protective coating on optical fibres, NYFORS’ new recoaters are sold exclusively by AFL in the North American market. 

Perfect for high strength applications, the ReCoater 2 allows the operator to choose different fibre and fibre-coating diameters. Fibres can be recoated at exactly the same diameter as well as smaller or larger diameters than the original fibre. This product can also be upgraded to the AutoCoater 2 by adding the AutoCoater 2 Dispensing Robot.

With the addition of the Dispensing Robot, which contains a remote reservoir tank, injection pump, supply lines and injection needle, the AutoCoater 2 performs fully automatic skill-independent recoating operations. The remote reservoir allows users to quickly change recoating compounds without the need to purge and clean the tank.

The MiniCoater 2 is best suited for small scale productions where fibre types and dimensions need to be changed frequently. It encompasses a cordless battery operation that allows for easy transportation, and similar to the ReCoater 2 and AutoCoater 2, the MiniCoater 2 can recoat fibres to a uniform, undersized or oversized diameter.

Lastly, the ReCoater 2XL is designed to process long sections of stripped fibre, accepting molds of up to 110 mm length. In addition, the ReCoater 2XL, AutoCoater 2, ReCoater 2 and MiniCoater 2 enable shorter curing times by using an UV LED array positioned along the length of the mold. All NYFORS recoaters, except the MiniCoater 2, come with an ergonomic, bench-top design for comfortable operation.

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