Corning

NEWS

Corning supplies FTTH infrastructure to STC

Saudi Telecom Company (STC) has chosen Corning’s optical solutions for the expansion of its national network for high-speed connectivity and fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) applications.

The agreement builds on the existing relationship between the two parties, which has seen more than 1.5 million kilometres of optical fibre supplied across the provider’s network. The companies are additionally collaborating to develop a program of advanced technical training to STC fibre engineers and technicians.

NEWS

3M offloads communications division to Corning for $900M

Corning has agreed to buy substantially all of 3M’s Communication Markets Division to for $900 million in cash. The deal is part of the company’s strategy to spend $1 billion to $3 billion in acquisitions, Corning said.

3M’s communications business, which has annual global sales of about $400 million, consists of optical fibre and copper passive connectivity products for the telecom industry – including xDSL, FTTx and structured cabling systems – and, in certain countries, telecom system integration services.

FEATURE

Fibre and cable for the cloud

Advances in data centre-related infrastructure are largely driven by increased network demand for higher bandwidth, faster service and ubiquitous access. Because of these trends, very high fibre-count cables (more than 3,000 optical fibres) become essential for connecting hyperscale data centres within a campus over distances of less than 10km. Another application space that is currently a topic of active interest in the industry is metro data centre interconnect (DCI).

FEATURE

One fibre everywhere

Network owners have much to consider when designing access networks. The network has to be able to support high-data rates and to maximise coverage area from the central office. Ideally, it should take advantage of low cost installation techniques and hardware miniaturisation. Once deployed, the network may have a lifespan of 15 to 20 years so upgrades to higher data rates must be supported. Finally, but not least, backwards compatibility is essential to ensure that new installations can be connected to equipment that has been already installed.

Feature

Six months after it became mandatory for copper and fibre cables supplied to EU/EEA member states to comply with the Construction Product Regulation and carry CE marking, Keely Portway asks what, if any, effect this has had on cable suppliers

Feature

To continue growing data traffic, optical scientists are tackling tough questions about nonlinear effects in optical fibre, discovers Andy Extance 

Feature

January of this year saw Jerry Rawls step down as chief executive of Finisar, a company he had grown from obscurity to worldwide success. He talks to Rebecca Pool about building his empire, the firm’s new CEO and a future that could include Oclaro*