Corning

ANALYSIS & OPINION

Space: The next frontier in optical networks

Roshene McCool and Matthew Guinan advise how operators can meet the connectivity distribution and densification challenge

Massive connection point distribution and optical fibre cable densification is occurring in access and data centre networks. Each connection point needs an optical fibre, so the number of fibre strands needed to deliver network connectivity is spiralling upwards, while space and physical pathways to route these fibres is fixed or rapidly being consumed.

FEATURE

In advance

Over the past several years, cable operators have seen their networks transform into the premier platform for transmission of data services, both for residential and business customers. In order to accommodate the growth of services and transmission speeds, the networks have been divided into smaller and smaller clusters of customers forming independent service groups.

NEWS

Corning supplies FTTH infrastructure to STC

Saudi Telecom Company (STC) has chosen Corning’s optical solutions for the expansion of its national network for high-speed connectivity and fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) applications.

The agreement builds on the existing relationship between the two parties, which has seen more than 1.5 million kilometres of optical fibre supplied across the provider’s network. The companies are additionally collaborating to develop a program of advanced technical training to STC fibre engineers and technicians.

NEWS

3M offloads communications division to Corning for $900M

Corning has agreed to buy substantially all of 3M’s Communication Markets Division to for $900 million in cash. The deal is part of the company’s strategy to spend $1 billion to $3 billion in acquisitions, Corning said.

3M’s communications business, which has annual global sales of about $400 million, consists of optical fibre and copper passive connectivity products for the telecom industry – including xDSL, FTTx and structured cabling systems – and, in certain countries, telecom system integration services.

FEATURE

Fibre and cable for the cloud

Advances in data centre-related infrastructure are largely driven by increased network demand for higher bandwidth, faster service and ubiquitous access. Because of these trends, very high fibre-count cables (more than 3,000 optical fibres) become essential for connecting hyperscale data centres within a campus over distances of less than 10km. Another application space that is currently a topic of active interest in the industry is metro data centre interconnect (DCI).

FEATURE

One fibre everywhere

Network owners have much to consider when designing access networks. The network has to be able to support high-data rates and to maximise coverage area from the central office. Ideally, it should take advantage of low cost installation techniques and hardware miniaturisation. Once deployed, the network may have a lifespan of 15 to 20 years so upgrades to higher data rates must be supported. Finally, but not least, backwards compatibility is essential to ensure that new installations can be connected to equipment that has been already installed.

Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang